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3 Tips To Help Adults With NVLD Land The Job Of Their Dreams, by Sally Perkins

By | Parents Blogs

Many studies state that 75 to 85 percent of young adults on the autism spectrum are unemployed. Young adults with Nonverbal Learning Disorder (NVLD) face a number of unique challenges in the workforce which can ultimately discourage applying and interviewing for a job. For example, it can be hard to understand nonverbal social cues from an interviewer. However, there are strategies that can help ease this transition and help your loved one land the job of their dreams. Check out these tips to prepare young adults with NVLD for applying, interviewing, and ultimately reaching all the professional success that they deserve.
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Hope, by Janet Kupris

By | Parents Blogs

My son was diagnosed with NVLD in the 4th grade. Given the fact that he and his brother were surviving triplets born at 24 weeks gestation you can only imagine the early intervention appointments they both had in the beginning when they came home from the NICU after each having lengthy stays.

Fast forward until now where they are both 21 years old. My son who was diagnosed with 100% NVLD in now a junior at UMASS Amherst. I was horrified when I learned this was one of his top picks for schools to attend.
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Strategies for Preparing Teens with NVLD for College, by Sally Perkins

By | Parents Blogs

Preparing your teen for college is no small task. Between test prep, college essays and applications, financial aid, and high school graduation, the time leading up to the first day of college is filled with plenty of activities. If your child has had to work through the symptoms of Non-Verbal Learning Disability (NVLD) throughout high school, you may be concerned with how to best prepare him or her for college life. It is a common misconception that college is not a realistic option for those who have NVLD. However, many individuals with the condition have gone on to graduate with a degree.
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Finally… an answer, by Louise Kolin

By | Parents Blogs

After 15 years we are finally beginning to understand our son.

When he began elementary school things were fine. He was an extremely bright child. By the time he was in first grade he was reading chapter books and excelling in math and sports. It wasn’t until he started second grade when I began to see he was struggling socially.
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The Subtleties of NVLD, by Jen de Anda

By | Parents Blogs

I was pretty sure something was different about him when he was very young. He had a funny walk and would fall a lot because he was fearless and would move too fast. He often seemed to be in his own head and I guess you could say he was quirky.

When he was a preschooler going in for a teeth cleaning, the hygienist was kept on her toes trying to clean his teeth because he was so active in his seat. By the third grade he could no longer be managed in a regular education setting! To be totally honest, I don’t think he was ever highly engaged in his preschool through second grade experience, but there were enough other distractions in those primary classrooms that his challenges could still be overlooked… or accommodated by teachers or volunteers.
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Is College a Realistic Option??, by Lore

By | Parents Blogs

The excitement mixed with a little anxiety most parents experience during a child’s senior year in high school. Mine is anxiety and uncertainty.

Seven years ago it was suggested my son may have Asperger’s. A few years later it just developed that he was simply on the Autism Spectrum. This was all unraveling while working on my Master’s Degree in psychology. My formal education, the intimate knowledge of my own son, and a gut feel persistently gnawed at me. The diagnosis just didn’t seem right. The pieces of the puzzle didn’t fit.
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“Failure to Launch” in NVLD Young Men, by Pamela Vaughn

By | Parents Blogs

My son, age 27, has NVLD. I do not have a written diagnosis for his NVLD as when he had his complete neuropsychological testing in 1998 that term was not used. His test results showed verbal spatial discrepancy of greater than 30 and WISC scores ranging from 5 on visual spatial tasks to 16 on isolated verbal tasks. (I am not a professional psychologist so I’m using this terminology as an amateur.). He struggled to get through high school and never formally met the high school graduation foreign language and math requirements. He did not go to college. He has had several minimum wage type jobs in landscaping and marine activities. He has no comprehension of why he can only get minimum wage jobs as his diagnosis has never been explained to him. I feel this is definitly hindered by the lack of a DSM diagnosis of NVLD. My son quit his job last week, and announced he must get a college degree to be successful. I don’t even know where to start in addressing this issue with a twenty seven year old young man, who wants to believe he is as capable as the next person, who could not sit still long enough for me to pronounce the words visual spatial deficit, but who verbally and in many ways intellectually is a lovely, strong, handsome young man who is totally confused about the world and how to fit into it and I as a parent am at a lost to help him.
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Is Homeschooling Right For You? The Pros and Cons of Taking Your Child Out of the Conventional Classroom, by Sally Perkins

By | Parents Blogs

It is assumed that every child must go to school in order to maximize their ability to learn and make friends. However, rules such as these do not include every type of child. For some children, especially those with a learning disability such as NVLD, school can be an incredibly stressful and emotional experience where no one really understands them or their needs. Indeed, this can quickly lead to social exclusion, bullying, and a lack of care from over worked teachers. If this sounds familiar, then it may be worth considering homeschooling your child. After all, you know how they tick more than anyone else.
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The Struggle of NVLD and the MN Education System, by Amanda Koski

By | Parents Blogs

My daughter Lexus has Nonverbal Learning Disorder. The fight I have been facing is with our school districts and trying to make them understand what NVLD is. I have been fighting this battle since my daughter was in 1st grade and have been blown off and disrespected by many in the school system. People don’t understand how severe NVLD is to a child who goes to school and it’s time that Nonverbal Learning Disorder is a recognized learning disability.
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A Tribute to My Son – Zak Jones 11/22/89, Rebirthed on 5/2/2017, by Sharon Jones

By | Parents Blogs

On May 2, 2017, at age 27, my son Zak (Zachary) Anthony Jones chose to no longer live with the pressures, NVLD or what we called NLD created for him in this world. A silent disability, where schools, doctors, and most psychiatrists have never even heard of, or even want to investigate or research or even try to understand. We would have to explain it to them, or in fact, beg them to even consider it a possibility or even listen to us! If it was not in their school specs, then it did not exist! Therefore there was never any help for my child here in the state of Ohio! Still even here in December, 2017, at the State Mental institution, where my son got placed on suicide watch. Not one Doctor, therapist or nurse ever heard about this disability, nor would they take the time to learn the easy ways of how to communicate with my son, while in there! We suffered through it alone. We couldn’t even find a psychiatrist, who understood it to even offer him a proper diagnosis! All we got was oh, what’s that, hmmm I’ll have to look it up (which no one ever did!) or oh well, it must be Autism, or he’s just fooling you, he’s just a smart-ass! How can he score 2nd-grade college level in 6th grade but, can’t organize his notebook, he’s just lazy! Time after time, my son was humiliated, due to the lack of understanding or their not wanting to understand!
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Our beautiful, angry, random, compassionate Kate, by Elizabeth Dohrer

By | Parents Blogs

Our journey with NVLD began 18 years ago, but we didn’t know it until Katie was in eighth grade. We knew Katie was different. When Katie was a toddler, she threw tantrums like a hellcat. No amount of coaxing, cajoling or threatening would make Katie change her mind about anything. As she grew, we didn’t know why she refused–vehemently–to do seemingly ordinary things, like ride a bike. She said she just wouldn’t. We believed we had a very obstinate child.
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Advocating For My NVLD Son, The Non-Voluntary Force, by Esmee

By | Parents Blogs

“I don’t understand, if this guy is going to die soon anyhow, why would you want to put on make-up before meeting him?”

“If the class is not a democracy, then basically you (the teacher) are the same as Hitler and Mussolini!” (not the most tactful thing to say at an Israeli school)

“What, did she just fart?!” (Imagine this: you are at dinner with friends where an elderly lady while coughing indeed suffers from the escape of some less pleasant gasses, ignored by all but emphasized loudly by your kid.)
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Our Diagnosis Run-Around, by Melinda

By | Parents Blogs

Our son has always been the “smart, lazy kid” in school. His work is sloppy and assignments get lost or forgotten. But my “lazy” child works very hard. I understand that when you have a student in your class who sounds like an encyclopedia, it’s hard to reconcile educational expectations with disability.

Our bridge to diagnosis was Dysgraphia. From the beginning of his schooling there were letter reversals. Sentences wandered around the page without regard for lines and margins. The spacing between words was random, if it was there at all. The way he formed letters was odd – retracing and doubling back in ways that were so much more complicated than they needed to be. It was all age appropriate in Kindergarten, and maybe even first grade, but it never got better.
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The Light Dawns, by Shannon Badger

By | Parents Blogs

I have ten children and one with NVLD. Anna is 13 and at the age of 10 suddenly many of the important people in her life started questioning if something was wrong with her because of her speech impediments, meltdowns when put under pressure in new environments, her tendency to stare back at you mutely when you asked her to explain herself. Unlike many NVLDs, she is not very verbal, though all her other symptoms track completely with NVLD. A friend suggested getting a prescription from our doctor for an evaluation with an occupational therapist. Our dear doctor suggested a blood test for diabetes (Anna was diagnosed with Type II diabetes; we believe she comfort eats), and to the occupational therapist and speech therapist. She was diagnosed as having delays in visual perception and fine motor coordination; her large motor clumsiness was attributed to her overweight. The speech therapist focused on phonology and was just getting into communication skills when we had to quit therapy because my husband lost his job.
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A Mother’s Instinct, by Denise Lennington

By | Parents Blogs

My daughter was diagnosed with ADHD at 8 years old as well as a spatial learning disability. I went to many national conferences and read every book I could to try and understand ADHD and learn how to be the best parent for her. We got the educational part of the situation under control but other issues arose with adolescence. For example, we invited 12 “friends” to her 12th birthday and no one came. First sign to me that socially we were not handling the situation correctly. I went into a search mode to figure it out. Came across a simple bound book written about NVLD on the Internet. Bought it, read it, cried….it was my child!!!
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My Daughter Unleashed

By | Parents Blogs

I am a parent of a 22 year old who was diagnosed with NVLD when she was in elementary school. My daughter had absolutely no sense of direction which made the prospect of her going out in the world and navigating the streets of New York City (where we live) very scary. What do I do, I thought. I can’t keep her tethered to me or someone else the rest of her life. Eventually, I said to myself, it is time to take the plunge. She was 12 at the time when her dad and I made the decision to put our fears aside. Thank goodness for cell phones. I knew it would be stressful to let my daughter out into the world but I knew it had to be done.
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