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NVLD Bloggers

Stepping Out Of Your Comfort Zone, by Eileen Herzog

By | NVLD Bloggers

Every so often in my life you join something that is extremely difficult however in the end you are so happy you made the decision to stay with it. I experienced this being the only varsity girl during my first year of cross-country and am grateful for all the personal connections and personal growth I made. Throughout all the challenges each of them turned into a tremendous positive with the help and support I received from my coach Jim Adams, and the members of the Canton cross country team. I was able to see that my disability wasn’t a detriment and realized people respected me for who I am.
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Finding Your Interests, by Eileen Herzog

By | NVLD Bloggers

Growing up with NVLD can make it extremely difficult to find your interest, as so many things are such a struggle. What many people forget is you can also find your interest in a non-traditional way such as being a fan rather being a participant. Sports are a great example of that. I know when I started sports it was clear it was going to be such a struggle. However, I loved being part of sports teams as I was able to become a fan and enjoy the daily social interactions. This led me to attend and watch multiple professional and college games over the years. It was a big reason why I was able to stay a three-season runner, as I knew how special it was to be part of a team. I was also able to understand my role was to be the strong supporter rather being the one who brings the points.
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The Importance of Having Support, by Eileen Herzog

By | NVLD Bloggers

Being told you have NVLD often brings many concerns for your family, as you fear the worst. One of the ways these fears can be minimized is to connect with a family who also has a child with a disability. It may be from a personal connection or joining a support group. It doesn’t need to be NVLD, as each disability, while different, is also very similar as each disability brings daily challenges.
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My Complicated NLD Relationship, by Caroline Novak

By | NVLD Bloggers

I was diagnosed with NVLD at the age of five. My parents noticed a delay when I was extremely speech delayed in speech and when I got to kindergarten, it was evident that something was awry. My kindergarten teacher noted that when everyone was cleaning up after free play, I would just keep on playing and I was extremely oblivious to all my surroundings. My parents then took me in for educational testing and it was then determined that I have NVLD. I was on an IEP until 7th grade when I switched from public to private school. I was consistently bullied for being a “SPED kid” and so my parents moved me to a private school.
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NVLD: It’s in My Nature, by Michaela Hearst

By | NVLD Bloggers

“Keep close to Nature’s heart… and break clear away, once in a while, and climb a mountain or
spend a week in the woods. Wash your spirit clean.”
-John Muir

Author, outdoorsman, and environmental philosopher John Muir is one of my heroes. In particular, this quote of his embodies how I seek to live my life.

My whole life, I have always found comfort in nature. I travel to rural environments every chance I get. Many people who know me know that I climb trees for fun! Ultimately, I don’t know where I would be without the comfort of the natural world.
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Suicide and NLD, by Deirdre StLuke

By | NVLD Bloggers

Again, the issue of suicide has popped up again on the media radar. Both Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain have managed to bring it to everyone’s plate and now we get to watch as social media spins out its version of “thoughts and prayers” in the form of “reach out.” Don’t get me wrong, it’s good advice. Completely useless to someone who is currently flirting with killing themselves, but good advice. What happens, though when you add Nonverbal Learning Disorder to the mix? Are we NLD Superheroes more susceptible to suicide as someone once suggested to me? To be honest, I don’t know. All I can talk about is my own experience with suicide and suicidal ideation.
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The Activity That Changed My Life, by Eileen Herzog

By | NVLD Bloggers

Throughout my life, I have a done a lot of things that were extremely difficult, though the one that had the most impact on me was running cross-country. The reason being, it was the first time in years that the adult in charge really understood me. Jim Adams, who was my coach, like my parents, raised exceptional children on both sides of the spectrum, so he had a deep understanding of the obstacles I faced on a daily basis and was able to see I had a number of strengths too. Honestly there was never a guarantee that I was going to be able to finish the race due to all the challenges I faced having NVLD, however, he always gave me the same advice, which was to not focus on how far away the other runners were, just to focus on doing my best, as that is the only thing that matters. I knew if a challenge occurred there was hope that the next run would go my way because he always offered such great advice and knew me so well personally. I wished things were different for me but he made sure I was staying true to myself and never gave up.
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The Quest: Seeking Employment with NLD, by Caitlin Gong

By | NVLD Bloggers

Getting a job is one of the most exciting things that can happen to anyone but finding the ideal job especially when you have a learning disability such as NLD can sometimes seem daunting. Through my personal experience I have found that it has been difficult to find work that suits my abilities and meets my employment needs. Hopefully the advice I have found can help you find a job with colleagues and leaders who understand your little quirks and will take the time to help you work through any difficult situations you may encounter.
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My Journal With NVLD, by Eileen Herzog

By | NVLD Bloggers

I remember starting school having no idea what was different about me along with being highly confused by the different services I received, as my friends were not going with me. As each elementary year passed, I started to have an idea about what was different about me. Later on things started to become even more confusing as social and academic demands were much higher. Socially, like all teenagers, my friends started to change, though with my disability I could not understand the rules of the game of adolescence. By that point, visual learning took place so it was clear I was starting to fall through the cracks. It seemed every day a teacher became frustrated with me though I was just overwhelmed and fatigued.
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