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The Subtleties of NVLD

By | Parents Blogs

I was pretty sure something was different about him when he was very young. He had a funny walk and would fall a lot because he was fearless and would move too fast. He often seemed to be in his own head and I guess you could say he was quirky.

When he was a preschooler going in for a teeth cleaning, the hygienist was kept on her toes trying to clean his teeth because he was so active in his seat. By the third grade he could no longer be managed in a regular education setting! To be totally honest, I don’t think he was ever highly engaged in his preschool through second grade experience, but there were enough other distractions in those primary classrooms that his challenges could still be overlooked… or accommodated by teachers or volunteers.
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Is College a Realistic Option??

By | Parents Blogs

The excitement mixed with a little anxiety most parents experience during a child’s senior year in high school. Mine is anxiety and uncertainty.

Seven years ago it was suggested my son may have Asperger’s. A few years later it just developed that he was simply on the Autism Spectrum. This was all unraveling while working on my Master’s Degree in psychology. My formal education, the intimate knowledge of my own son, and a gut feel persistently gnawed at me. The diagnosis just didn’t seem right. The pieces of the puzzle didn’t fit.
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“Failure to Launch” in NVLD Young Men, by Pamela Vaughn

By | Parents Blogs

My son, age 27, has NVLD. I do not have a written diagnosis for his NVLD as when he had his complete neuropsychological testing in 1998 that term was not used. His test results showed verbal spatial discrepancy of greater than 30 and WISC scores ranging from 5 on visual spatial tasks to 16 on isolated verbal tasks. (I am not a professional psychologist so I’m using this terminology as an amateur.). He struggled to get through high school and never formally met the high school graduation foreign language and math requirements. He did not go to college. He has had several minimum wage type jobs in landscaping and marine activities. He has no comprehension of why he can only get minimum wage jobs as his diagnosis has never been explained to him. I feel this is definitly hindered by the lack of a DSM diagnosis of NVLD. My son quit his job last week, and announced he must get a college degree to be successful. I don’t even know where to start in addressing this issue with a twenty seven year old young man, who wants to believe he is as capable as the next person, who could not sit still long enough for me to pronounce the words visual spatial deficit, but who verbally and in many ways intellectually is a lovely, strong, handsome young man who is totally confused about the world and how to fit into it and I as a parent am at a lost to help him.
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Adulting with NVLD, by Mercedes Gunn

By | NVLD Bloggers

I often thought that if I ever wrote my autobiography it would be titled “Trial and Error.” Living in no man’s land, where you are hanging from the autism spectrum line, but not close enough to the Asperger net, was, and still is rough.

I can remember having meltdowns and sensory processing issues. I was very picky about the texture and feel of my clothing. I was still learning how to regulate my emotions and would have frequent meltdowns and anger outbursts. I also spent a lot of time in the hospital and felt like a lab mouse because no one knew what was wrong with me. I had fevers that would come every two weeks and sometimes the fevers would cause me to have seizures. As a child, my parents fought the battle with various teachers, while I was stuck feeling like a freak on display, both in an academic sense and in a social sense.
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The Girl Who Wasn’t Autistic, by Miranda Kibel

By | NVLD Bloggers

I knew I was different all my life, but I thought that was a good thing, as that was the message “Dragon Tales” gave to me. I actually have traits of several disorders, but the thing that affected me most harshly was the fact that I prioritized verbal messages above all else. It was okay to “be myself” even if that meant picking my nose (a trait of repetitive behavior disorder, formerly thought of as OCD). My babysitter said it was “okay to cry” so I cried loudly in front of my classmates despite my teacher telling me I was embarrassing myself. When I was finally put in social skills training. I kept asking the speech therapists repeatedly what to do in specific situations and their answers were perennially vague. Due to my difficulties with timing and attention, I never mastered social skills in a group setting, and possibly never will.
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Is Homeschooling Right For You? The Pros and Cons of Taking Your Child Out of the Conventional Classroom, by Sally Perkins

By | Parents Blogs

It is assumed that every child must go to school in order to maximize their ability to learn and make friends. However, rules such as these do not include every type of child. For some children, especially those with a learning disability such as NVLD, school can be an incredibly stressful and emotional experience where no one really understands them or their needs. Indeed, this can quickly lead to social exclusion, bullying, and a lack of care from over worked teachers. If this sounds familiar, then it may be worth considering homeschooling your child. After all, you know how they tick more than anyone else.
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The Outcast, by Iris Lamar

By | NVLD Bloggers

When I was little, the Drs thought I had A.D.H.D but could not figure out why it was so severe. Kids made fun of me, I ran into everything and I did not understand social constructs at all. Finally I was diagnosed with NVLD. It is now 20 years later, and I still struggle, but having a name for the disorder, and people who help and understand makes all the difference!
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The Right Summer Camp Can Make A World Of Difference To Children With NVLD, by Debbie & Eric Sasson

By | Experts Blog

Life can be very lonely when it feels like people don’t “get” you.  Our campers tell us that camp gives them an opportunity to be a part of something bigger, to be a member of a community where people understand them and appreciate them for who they are.  Many people find it hard to imagine that summer camp can provide more than a few weeks of fun activities.  And yet, camp is so much more.  Residential camp gives children an opportunity to meet peers who have similar interests and experiences, but also to be more independent, to learn resiliency, to feel a sense of agency.
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